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Queensland public service workforce statistics quick facts

1. December 2017 workforce statistics quick facts

There are 218,957.06 full-time equivalent (FTE) employees in the sector, a net decrease of 33.44 FTE (-0.02%) since June 2017.

This compares with a decrease in FTE for the same quarter in 2016 of 214.63 FTE (-0.11 per cent).

Notable increases and decreases in agencies are set out below:

  • Department of Justice and Attorney-General had a net increase of 186.41 FTE (2.09%):
    • 76 FTE mainly due to the Queensland Government's response to Queensland Parole System Review recommendations and an increase in custodial correctional officers due to the increase in prisoner numbers ensuring the protection of the Queensland community.
    • 53 FTE mainly due to the increase in the number of staff recruited relating to the Government’s commitment to transition 17 year old young people into the Youth Justice system.
    • 40 FTE mainly due to preparation for the transition of 17 year olds into the Youth Justice System, which will impact the Children's Court, and increased FTE related to the continued rollout of specialist Domestic and Family Violence Courts and the reintroduction of the Drug Court.
  • Department of Transport and Main Roads had a net increase of 84.73 FTE (1.17%):  
    • 30 FTE in the Customers Services Branch relating to 22 FTE school crossing supervisors for new school crossings across the state and an increase in hours of many existing school crossing supervisors during the December quarter to focus on improving students safety travelling to and from schools, and 8 FTE supporting the Queensland Government’s commitment to delivering a new personalised framework for personalised transport services that respond to technological change, allowing greater choice and an improved experience for customers.
    • 33 FTE in the Program Delivery & Operations Branch relating to an increase of temporary employment for the Commonwealth Games Office and associated Commonwealth Games transport planning activities.
    • 18 FTE to support the delivery of services from the Maritime Safety Queensland Branch in Cairns, Gladstone and Townsville, and the delivery of services from the Engineering and Technology Branch for supporting regions in the delivery of QTRIP.
  • Department of Science, Information, Technology and Innovation had a net increase of 56.86 FTE (2.21%) predominantly attributed to the conversion of a number of agency temporary staff in Smart Service Queensland being transitioned to permanent public service employees.
  • Queensland Police Service had a net increase of 21.38 FTE (0.14%):
    • Police and staff member separations were offset by the commencement of new recruits, swearing in of existing recruits as police, and employment of new staff members. Police officer numbers fell slightly over the quarter, but it is planned that this will be rectified by the end of the Financial Year (due to planned graduations of Recruits as Police). 
  • QH (including Department of Health, Hospital and Health Services (HHS) and Queensland Ambulance Service) had a net decrease of 192.27 FTE (0.23%) for the December 2017 quarter, attributed to:
    • A decrease of 365 FTE from Hospital and Health Services.
    • An increase of 94 FTE in Department of Health Statewide Business units, of which 37 FTE are in frontline/frontline support roles, and 57 FTE in corporate roles.
    • An increase of 65 FTE in the Queensland Ambulance Service, related to planned recruitment of ambulance operatives as per the 2017-18 Service Delivery Statement.
  • DET had a net decrease of 168.29 FTE (0.24%) attributed to:
    • A decrease of 244 teachers attributed to the school vacation period falling within the collection period, and subsequent decrease in temporary and casual employees required.
    • An increase of 11 FTE corporate staff utilized in school locations.
    • And increase of 63 FTE corporate staff utilized in non-school based locations.
    • The school-based staffing proportion was 94.6% of the total DET workforce. This is a decrease of 0.1 per cent from September 2017.
  • Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services had a net decrease of 71.72 FTE (1.21%) for the December 2017 quarter, attributed to the roll out of the National Disability Insurance Scheme.
  • TAFE Queensland by 62.59 FTEs (1.56%). The TAFE Queensland business model is driven by consumer demand, so the decrease in FTE can be attributed to normal business fluctuations.

63.60 per cent of our workforce is located outside of Brisbane inner city and Brisbane suburbs.

It continues to be the case that more than 9 out of 10 public servants (91.13%) are engaged in frontline and frontline support roles:

  • frontline roles are those that deliver services directly to the public (e.g. teachers, nurses, doctors, police officers, ambulance officers and firefighters).
  • frontline support roles are ‘non-corporate services’ roles that provide essential support, enabling the effective delivery of frontline services (e. g hospital and school cleaners, road workers and school groundskeepers).

For the December quarter, the sector has slightly increased its proportion of corporate service roles to 8.87%, an increase of 0.11% from the September 2017 quarter.

Traditionally, the September to December quarter displays an increase in the proportion of corporate services roles due largely to the reduction in frontline temporary and casual employees in service delivery agencies (such as Queensland Health and Department of Education and Training) affected by holiday and school vacation periods.

Corporate services employees are integral to the proper functioning of the public sector and are employed in payroll, human resource management, information and communications technology, accounting and finance, audit and legal, procurement, property and facilities management, and communications.

Public servants work in 20 departments and 15 agencies. Queensland Health, the Department of Education and Training and TAFE, and the Queensland Police Service are the largest employers. Collectively, they account for 79.02% (almost 4 out of 5 public servants) of the public sector workforce.

More than two-thirds of Queensland public sector FTE (66.89%) are women, and more than three‑quarters of Queensland public sector FTE (79.69%) are permanently employed.


2. September 2017 workforce statistics quick facts

There are 218,990.50 full-time equivalent (FTE) employees in the sector, a net increase of 1,412.61 FTE (0.65%) since June 2017.

This compares with growth for the same quarter in 2016 of 721.63 FTE (0.34 per cent).

Notable increases and decreases in agencies are set out below:

  • Queensland Health (including Department of Health, Hospital and Health Services and Queensland Ambulance Service) had a net increase of 780.40 FTE (0.93%), with the largest increases in the HHS’s of 758.41 FTE consisting of:
    • 728.98 FTE frontline and frontline support roles
    • 29.43 FTE corporate roles.
    • 599.01 FTE (82.17%) of the growth in frontline and frontline support roles was attributed to:
      • Sunshine Coast HHS – 183.51 FTE (continuous development of the Sunshine Coast University Hospital)
      • Metro South HHS – 149.51 FTE (growth in eHealth projects including Digital Hospital, iRMS, additional workforce at Logan Hospital, additional nursing workforce at QEII Hospital and additional nursing workforce in addiction and mental health services at PAH)
      • Gold Coast HHS – 118.32 FTE (growth in additional workforce in cancer services at Robina Hospital, and Gold Coast University Hospital)
      • Mackay HHS – 76.76 FTE (grown in ieMR implementation and increasing demands on services)
      • Metro North HHS – 70.91 FTE (growth in additional operational workforce in patient support services at Royal Brisbane and Royal Womens, additional nursing workforce at Prince Charles Hospital)
  • Department of Education and Training had a net increase of 459.90 FTE (0.66%):
    • 296 more teachers
    • 141 more teacher aides
    • 17 more corporate roles
    • 11 more cleaners.
    • The school-based staffing proportion was 94.7% of the total DET workforce. This remained steady from the June 2017 quarter.
  • Department of Justice and Attorney-General had a net increase of 112.74 FTE (1.28%):
    • 62.73 FTE increase in Queensland Corrective Services is mainly due to the Qld Government's response to Queensland Parole System Review recommendations and an increase in custodial correctional officers due to the increase in prisoner numbers, ensuring the protection of the Queensland community.
    • 35.52 FTE increase in Youth Justice Services is mainly due to the number of staff to support the transition of 17 year olds into the Youth Justice System and an increase in the number of youth workers to ensure protection of the Queensland community against youth offending.
    • 11.73 FTE increase in Justice Services is mainly due to the increase in staff for Office of Public Guardian due to growth in children and young people going into care, growing guardianship appointments and impacts of progressive implementation of the NDIS across the state.
  • Queensland Police Service had a net increase of 126.36 FTE (0.84%):
    • Increase in police officers primarily due to graduation of recruits to become police officers (i.e. First Year Constables allocated to stations).
    • Decrease in police recruits due to graduation of recruits to become police officers.
    • Increase in staff members primarily due to the filling of vacancies.
    • Note, in addition to the above, fluctuations during the quarter were influenced by changes in status (paid vs unpaid) and changes in work pattern (employee FTE).
  • TAFE Queensland had a net decrease of 55.71 FTEs (1.37%):
    • The TAFE Queensland business model is driven by consumer demand, so the decrease in FTE can be attributed to normal business fluctuations.
  • PSBA had a net decrease of 32.41 FTE (2.93%) attributed to attrition and changes in paid status of staff engaged for the delivery of PSBA priorities such as:
    • provision of professional ICT, financial, procurement, asset management and human resource services to the Queensland Police Service, Queensland Fire and Emergency Services, and Office of the Inspector-General Emergency Management;
    • provision of ICT services to the Queensland Ambulance Service and Queensland Corrective Services; and
    • management of Queensland Government Air Wing services.
    • The provision of these priorities helps fulfil the Government’s objectives of delivering quality frontline services and building safe, caring and connected communities.
    • In addition to attrition and changes in paid status, FTE strengths are impacted by engagement of new employees and/or changes in work pattern (employee FTE).

63.60 per cent of our workforce is located outside of Brisbane inner city and Brisbane suburbs

It continues to be the case that more than 9 out of 10 public servants (91.24%) are engaged in frontline and frontline support roles:

  • frontline roles are those that deliver services directly to the public (e.g. teachers, nurses, doctors, police officers, ambulance officers and firefighters)
  • frontline support roles are ‘non-corporate services’ roles that provide essential support, enabling the effective delivery of frontline services (e. g hospital and school cleaners, road workers and school groundskeepers).

For the September quarter, the sector has maintained its proportion of corporate service roles at 8.76%. 

The public sector had a minor reduction in the proportion of corporate services roles from June 2017 to September 2017. Corporate services roles account for 8.76% (down from 8.82%), or 19,191.02 FTE (down from 19,196.65 FTE), of all roles in the sector

Corporate services employees are integral to the proper functioning of the public sector and are employed in payroll, human resource management, information and communications technology, accounting and finance, audit and legal, procurement, property and facilities management, and communications.

Public servants work in 20 departments and 15 agencies. Queensland Health, the Department of Education and Training and TAFE, and the Queensland Police Service are the largest employers. Collectively, they account for 79.20% (almost 4 out of 5 public servants) of the public sector workforce.

More than two-thirds of Queensland public sector FTE (66.89%) are women, and more than three‑quarters of Queensland public sector FTE (78.73%) are permanently employed.


3. June 2017 workforce statistics quick facts

There are 217,577.89 full-time equivalent (FTE) employees in the Queensland public sector – an increase of 1,651.05 FTE (0.76 per cent) since March 2017.

This compares with growth for the same quarter in 2016 of 2,544.23 FTE (1.21 per cent).

Notable increases and decreases in agencies are set out below:

  • Queensland Health (including Department of Health, Hospital and Health Services and Queensland Ambulance Service) had a net increase of 809.72 FTE (0.98%):
    • largest increases have been in the HHS’s of 771.16 FTE consisting of:
      • 757.82 FTE frontline and frontline support roles
      • 13.34 FTE corporate roles
    • 480.99 FTE (57.6%) of the growth in frontline and frontline support roles is attributed to:
      • Sunshine Coast HHS (the opening of Sunshine Coast University Hospital)
      • Metro North HHS (growth areas including Inpatient, Emergency Department and Mental Health)
      • Metro South HHS (growth in QEII Hospital and Community Wellbeing Program)
      • West Moreton HHS (growth in Inpatient, Outpatient, Emergency Department and Mental Health).
  • Department of Education and Training had a net increase of 660.13 FTE (0.96%):
      • 293.70 more teachers
      • 241.83 more teacher aides
      • 90.01 more corporate roles
      • 36.53 more cleaners.
    • The school-based staffing proportion was 94.7% of the total DET workforce. This remained steady from the March 2017 quarter.
  • Department of Justice and Attorney-General had a net increase of 93.14 FTE (1.07%):
    • Queensland Corrective Services increase in the number of custodial correctional officers due to the increase in prisoner numbers to ensure the protection of the Queensland community.
    • Office of Director of Public Prosecutions increase due to recruitment of temporary legal support officers and temporary admin staff to manage the high workload of public prosecution services to ensure a fair and just society.
    • Youth Justice increase in the number of youth workers, including youth detention workers and case workers to ensure protection of the Queensland community against youth crime.
  • Queensland Police Service had a net increase of 72.54 FTE (0.49%):
    • Increase in police officers primarily due to graduation of recruits to become police officers (i.e. First Year Constables allocated to stations). Decrease in police recruits due to graduation of recruits to become police officers. Increase in staff members primarily due to the filling of vacancies. Note, in addition to the above, fluctuations during the quarter are influenced by changes in status (paid vs unpaid) and changes in work pattern (employee FTE).
  • We saw a decrease in FTEs in TAFE Queensland by 99.45 FTEs:
    • The separation of temporary and contract engagements to meet the business needs of TAFE, with an end date of 30 June 2017;
    • TAFE no longer reporting 53 FTE in the MOHRI system associated with the Australia Pacific Technical College (APTC). Following a recent Australian Taxation Office ruling, TAFE Queensland determined to change the employment arrangements for TAFE Queensland staff employed at APTC, in that these staff are now employed by TAFE Queensland Education International Pty. Ltd. (rather than directly employed by TAFE Queensland). Consequently, they are no longer included in the MOHRI reporting to the PSC

63.49% of the public sector workforce is located outside of Brisbane inner city and Brisbane suburbs.

It continues to be the case that more than 9 out of 10 public servants (91.18%) are engaged in frontline and frontline support roles:

  • frontline roles are those that deliver services directly to the public (e.g. teachers, nurses, doctors, police officers, ambulance officers and firefighters)
  • frontline support roles are ‘non-corporate services’ roles that provide essential support, enabling the effective delivery of frontline services (e. g hospital and school cleaners, road workers and school groundskeepers).

For the June quarter, the sector has maintained its proportion of corporate service roles at 8.82%. 

Corporate services employees are integral to the proper functioning of the public sector and are employed in payroll, human resource management, information and communications technology, accounting and finance, audit and legal, procurement, property and facilities management, and communications.

Public servants work in 20 departments and 15 agencies. Queensland Health, the Department of Education and Training and TAFE, and the Queensland Police Service are the largest employers. Collectively, they account for 79.10% (almost 4 out of 5 public servants) of the public sector workforce.

More than two-thirds of Queensland public sector FTE (66.80%) are women, and more than three‑quarters of Queensland public sector FTE (78.940%) are permanently employed.


4. March 2017 workforce statistics quick facts

There are 215,926.84 full-time equivalent (FTE) employees in the Queensland public sector — an increase of 3,287.57 FTE (1.55 per cent) since December 2016.

This compares with growth for the same quarter in 2016 of 4,058.34 FTE (1.97 per cent).

Notable increases and decreases in agencies are set out below:

  • Queensland Health (including Department of Health, Hospital and Health Services and Queensland Ambulance Service) had a net increase of 2,521.64 FTE (3.14%)
    • largest increases have been in the HHS’s of 2,300.93 FTE consisting of;
      • 1,965.68 FTE frontline roles
      • 322.44 FTE frontline support roles
      • 12.81 FTE corporate roles
      • 318.49 FTE (95%) of the growth in frontline support and corporate roles is attributed to Sunshine Coast HHS (the opening of Sunshine Coast University Hospital).
  • Department of Education and Training
    • 478.07 FTE (0.70%) attributed to normal business fluctuations with the commencement of the school year
  • Department of Justice and Attorney-General
    • 156.72 FTE custodial officers based on an approved funding model proportionately aligned with the increase in prisoners to ensure public safety
    • 17.18 FTE due to recruitment of youth workers, including youth detention workers and case workers to ensure protection of the Queensland community against youth crime
    • 11.78 FTE in Director of Public Prosecutions due to recruitment of temporary legal support officers and temporary admin staff to manage the high workload of public prosecution services to ensure a fair and just society
  • TAFE Queensland
    • 111.86 FTE (2.76%) attributed to normal business fluctuations associated with the commencement of TAFE year, reflecting community demand for TAFE training programs.
  • Queensland Police Service had a net decrease of -90.35 FTE or -0.60% and is attributable to:   
    • The separation of 184.4 FTE, consisting of 73.89 FTE sworn officers and 110.51 FTE staff members
    • The engagement of 90.58 FTE, consisting of a net increase of 27 new recruits and 63.58 FTE staff members
    • The net reduction of police officers for the March 2017 period was 46.89 FTE, however it needs to be noted that minor fluctuations in Police FTE numbers does not impact the “on the ground frontline” police effort, as this effort is maintained by the management of rostering and leave arrangements
  • Queensland Fire and Emergency Services had a net decrease of -33.83 FTE or -1.04% and is attributable to fluctuations in normal business.

63.49% of the public sector workforce is located outside of Brisbane inner city and Brisbane suburbs.

It continues to be the case that more than 9 out of 10 public servants (91.18%) are engaged in frontline and frontline support roles:

  • frontline roles are those that deliver services directly to the public (e.g. teachers, nurses, doctors, police officers, ambulance officers and firefighters)
  • frontline support roles are ‘non-corporate services’ roles that provide essential support, enabling the effective delivery of frontline services (e. g hospital and school cleaners, road workers and school groundskeepers).

For the March quarter, the sector has marginally decreased in the proportion of corporate service roles from 9.14 per cent to 8.82 per cent, or 398.80 FTE. 

Corporate services employees are integral to the proper functioning of the public sector and are employed in payroll, human resource management, information and communications technology, accounting and finance, audit and legal, procurement, property and facilities management, and communications.

Public servants work in 20 departments and 15 agencies. Queensland Health, the Department of Education and Training and TAFE, and the Queensland Police Service are the largest employers. Collectively, they account for 79.04% (almost 4 out of 5 public servants) of the public sector workforce.

More than two-thirds of Queensland public sector FTE (66.72%) are women, and more than three-quarters of Queensland public sector FTE (79.04%) are permanently employed.


5. December 2016 workforce statistics quick facts

For the December 2016 quarter, there are 212,639.27 full-time equivalent (FTE) employees in the Queensland public sector — a decrease of 214.63 FTE (-0.10%) since September 2016.

This compares with growth for the same quarter in 2015 of 319.92 FTE (0.15 per cent).

Notable increases and decreases in agencies are set out below:

  • Justice and Attorney-General (DJAG) had a net increase of 235.14 FTE (2.83 per cent) including:
    • 131 FTE who deliver Blue Card Services, via a machinery of government (MOG) change from 1 October 2016 from the PSBA;
    • 16 FTE increase in Office of Public Guardian to implement child safety reform initiatives, and undertaking higher complex advocacy services to vulnerable children in the community;
    • 61 FTE custodial officers (based on an approved funding model proportionately aligned with the increase in prisoners to ensure public safety);
    • 7 FTE in Director Child Protection Litigation reflecting current workload requirements due to unforeseen increase in numbers of child court orders, meeting community and government’s expectations for timely management of child court orders;
    • 8 FTE for the re-establishment of the Sentencing Advisory Council, to advise both the community and Government on sentencing matters and practices;
    • 12 FTE in the Community Justice Program providing services to remote groups including support services to the community in the newly established Murri Courts.
  • Department of Transport and Main Roads (DTMR) had a net increase of 60.66 FTE (0.86 per cent) including:
    • Customer Services, Safety and Regulation – (35.6 FTE)
      • 22 FTE increase to School Crossing Supervisors
      • 9.4 FTE Customer Service Centre staff to manage seasonal increase in call volumes at our Call Centre
      • 4.2 FTE Temporary Project Staff to manage the transition of DJAG locations to TMR
    • TransLink – (22.8 FTE)
      • 8.8 FTE Temporary Project Specific Roles which includes Passenger Transport review implementation and other business critical projects
      • 10 FTE increase to core frontline roles (including Senior Network Officers)
      • 4 FTE to fill vacancies of various roles (project management, Passenger Transport Futures, Next Generation Rollingstock)
    • Other variations that occurred across TMR are considered business as usual and make up the difference to TMR’s net increase of 60.66 FTEs.
  • Department of Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning (DILGP) had a net increase of 41.63 FTE (9.31 per cent) including:
    • Transition of 13.4 FTE from Department of Transport and Main Roads for the Cross River Rail project
    • Machinery of Government change for the transition of 21 FTE corporate staff from DSD including Finance and Procurement skills;
    • Filling of temporary positions created for Planning projects (15 FTE approved Development Assessment system transition and policy & legislation projects; positions being filled as required)
  • Queensland Police Service had a net increase of 31.46 FTE (0.21 per cent) attributable to:
    • 70 FTE increase of new police recruits
    • 40 FTE increase in staff members
    • Offset by a decrease of 79 FTE, 56 FTE of which where police officers; 21 FTE by age retirement and 27 FTE by resignation
    • Note the increase of 40.34 FTE staff members consisted of 33.86 operational positions (frontline support) and 6.48 FTE non-operational positions (corporate)
  • Queensland Art Gallery had a net increase of 31.14 FTE (11.36%) attributable to:
    • Additional staff to assist with the 10th anniversary celebrations associated with the Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA)
  • Queensland Museum had a net increase of 22.74 (9.31%) attributable to:
    • Additional staff to assist with the World Science Festival and the Hadron Collider exhibition.
  • Queensland Health (including Department of Health, Hospital and Health Services and Queensland Ambulance Service) had a net decrease of -6.66 FTE (-0.01 per cent) and is attributable to fluctuations in normal business.  
  • Education and Training had a net decrease of -319.35 FTE (-0.47 per cent) and is attributable to the school vacation period falling within the collection period, and subsequent decrease in temporary and casual employees being required.

63% of the public sector workforce is located outside of Brisbane inner city and Brisbane suburbs.

It continues to be the case that more than 9 out of 10 public servants (90.86%) are engaged in frontline and frontline support roles:

  • frontline roles are those that deliver services directly to the public (e.g. teachers, nurses, doctors, police officers, ambulance officers and firefighters)
  • frontline support roles are ‘non-corporate services’ roles that provide essential support, enabling the effective delivery of frontline services (e. g hospital and school cleaners, road workers and school groundskeepers).

For the December quarter, the sector has marginally increased in the proportion of corporate service roles from 9.12 per cent to 9.14 per cent, or 30.30 FTE. 

Traditionally, the September to December quarters display a pattern where the proportion of corporate services roles increases, as front-line roles predominantly linked to service delivery agencies such as Queensland Health and Department of Education and Training, are affected by reductions in temporary and casual employees over the holiday and school vacation periods.

Corporate services employees are integral to the proper functioning of the public sector and are employed in payroll, human resource management, information and communications technology, accounting and finance, audit and legal, procurement, property and facilities management, and communications.

Public servants work in 20 departments and 15 agencies. Queensland Health, the Department of Education and Training and TAFE, and the Queensland Police Service are the largest employers. Collectively, they account for 78.84% (almost 4 out of 5 public servants) of the public sector workforce.

More than two-thirds of Queensland public sector FTE (66.67%) are women, and more than three-quarters of Queensland public sector FTE (78.96%) are permanently employed.


6. September 2016 workforce statistics quick facts

There are 212,853.90 full-time equivalent (FTE) employees in the Queensland public sector — an increase of 721.63 FTE (0.34%) since June 2016. This compares with growth for the same quarter in 2015 of 1,868.28 FTE (0.92%), a difference of 1,146.65 FTE.

The increase in FTE is in agencies which have a strong focus on service delivery.

Queensland Health, including Department of Health, Hospital and Health Services (HHSs) and the Queensland Ambulance Service, experienced a net increase of 300.20 FTE (0.37%):

  • doctors increased by 97.01 FTE
  • nurses increased by 142.57 FTE

Department of Education and Training (DET) increased by 433.85 FTE (0.64%) — primarily attributed to:

  • teachers increased by 290.06 FTE
  • teacher aides increased by 134.22 FTE.

While the Queensland Police Service (QPoS) and Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES) both had sizeable net increases for the quarter, these were largely due to machinery-of-government (MoG) transfers from the Public Safety Business Agency (PSBA).

  • QPoS had a net increase of 664.40 FTE attributed largely to implementing the PSBA review recommendations and MoG transfer of 630 FTE from PSBA.
  • QFES had a net increase of 158.58 FTE attributed largely to the PSBA review recommendations and MoG transfer of 146 FTE from PSBA.

Department of Justice and Attorney-General (DJAG) increased by 81.15 FTE (0.99%) — primarily attributed to an increase in custodial officers (54.91 FTE), and the Youth Justice Regions associated with the Restorative Justice Program (19.68 FTE).

The PSBA had the largest FTE decrease of 767.52 FTE (38.18%), associated with the MoG transfers to QPoS and QFES. Approximately 130 FTE, who deliver Blue Card Services, will transition to DJAG as part of the PSBA review recommendations, but currently remain within the PSBA numbers for this quarter.

63% of the public sector workforce is located outside of Brisbane inner city and Brisbane suburbs.

It continues to be the case that more than 9 out of 10 public servants (90.88%) are engaged in frontline and frontline support roles:

  • frontline roles are those that deliver services directly to the public (e.g. teachers, nurses, doctors, police officers, ambulance officers and firefighters)
  • frontline support roles are ‘non-corporate services’ roles that provide essential support, enabling the effective delivery of frontline services (e.g. hospital and school cleaners, road workers and school groundskeepers).

For the September quarter, the public sector has marginally increased in the proportion of corporate service roles from 8.9% to 9.12%. 

Of the overall increase of 721.63 FTE, the public sector increased frontline/frontline support roles by 202.93 FTE, and increased corporate services roles by 518.70 FTE. Corporate services roles are an essential part of the sector workforce by supporting frontline and frontline support delivery to the community.

The increase of 518.70 FTE corporate services roles is explained by:

  • 256.15 FTE increase in Queensland Health includes:
    • 111.02 FTE increase associated with the opening of the Sunshine Coast University Hospital
    • 47.51 FTE increase at the Gold Coast Hospital associated with various information technology (IT) projects, such as the integrated electronic medical record (ieMR) Remediation Project
    • 37.41 FTE increase at Metro North HHS associated with increased inpatient/outpatient activities and project roles required to support the HHS on a short-term basis
    • 23.55 FTE increase at Metro South HHS corresponding with a downward fluctuation in frontline/frontline support roles with these staff undertaking corporate/project roles
  • TAFE detected inconsistencies in corporate services coding after transition to a new human resource (HR) information system and undertook a data cleansing exercise in the September quarter. This led to 318.73 FTE that were already recorded in the public sector count as frontline/frontline support, being correctly re-coded as corporate services roles.

Corporate services employees are integral to the proper functioning of the public sector and are employed in payroll, HR management, information and communications technology, accounting and finance, audit and legal, procurement, property and facilities management, and communications.

Public servants work in 20 departments and 15 agencies. Queensland Health, DET, TAFE and the QPoS are the largest employers. Collectively, they account for 78.94% (almost 4 out of 5 public servants) of the public sector workforce.

More than two-thirds of Queensland public sector headcount (66.61%) are women, and more than three-quarters of Queensland public sector FTE (78.56%) are permanently employed.


7. June 2016 workforce statistics quick facts

The Queensland Public Sector (QPS) quarterly workforce profile indicates there are 212,132.27 full-time equivalent (FTE) employees in the QPS.

There has been an overall increase of 1.21 per cent or 2,544.23 FTE up from 209,588.04 FTE in March 2016.

The majority of the FTE increase (87.25 per cent) can be attributed to increases in six agencies which have a strong focus on service delivery. Greatest FTE increases occurred in:

  • Queensland Health, including Department of Health, Hospital and Health Services and the Queensland Ambulance Service, increased by 1083.48 FTE (1.37 per cent).  This includes increases in:
    • nursing (429.38 FTE)
    • allied health practitioners, professionals and technical staff (124.71 FTE)
    • doctors (40.15 FTE).
  • Department of Education and Training increased by 857.85 FTE (1.28 per cent).  This can be primarily attributed to an increase in teachers (251.52 FTE) and teacher aides (404.20 FTE).
  • Department of Justice and Attorney-General increased by 92.78 FTE (1.14 per cent).  This increase reflects the recommissioning of the Borallon correctional centre and the application of double-up prison funding.
  • Queensland Fire and Emergency Services increased by 90.56 FTE (2.99 per cent), which can be primarily attributed to Firefighter recruits, as well as Rural Firefighters, Rural Fire Instructors and Bushfire Safety Officers, as well as the effects of implementing recommendations from the review of the Public Safety Business Agency.
  • Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services increased by 52.49 FTE (0.89 per cent). This includes increases in child safety officers and child safety support officers, clinicians, court co-ordinators and residential care officers.
  • Department of Transport and Main Road increased by 42.58 FTE (0.61 per cent), including 16 more civil engineers to ensure the delivery of high priority road projects across the state, from Cape York to Wide Bay Burnett, Ipswich and Toowoomba.

TAFE increase of 211.74 FTE (5.34 per cent) is mainly attributed to the inclusion of TAFE’s casual teaching workforce, which were not included in the two previous quarters due to unforeseen technical problems with their human resource information system.

The health and education (excluding TAFE) sectors collectively account for three-quarters or 76.30 per cent of the total FTE increase in June 2016.

63.00 per cent of the public sector workforce is located outside of Brisbane inner city and Brisbane suburbs.

More than 9 out of 10 public servants (91.10 per cent) in the Queensland Government are engaged in frontline and frontline support roles:

  • Frontline roles are those that deliver services directly to the public, including teachers, nurses, doctors, police officers, ambulance officers and firefighters.
  • Frontline support roles are ‘non-corporate services’ roles that provide essential support, enabling the effective delivery of frontline services, including hospital and school cleaners, road workers and school groundskeepers.

Corporate services employees are integral to the proper functioning of the public sector and are employed in such crucial areas as payroll and human resource management, information and communications technology, accounting and finance, audit and legal services, procurement, property and facilities management, and communication and information services.

Public sector employees work in 20 government departments and 15 other government organisations.  The biggest employers are Queensland Health, the Department of Education and Training and TAFE, and the Queensland Police Service.  Together they make up 78.56 per cent of the public sector workforce.  In other words, almost four out of every five public sector employees are engaged in providing health, education and training, and police services.

More than two-thirds of Queensland public sector headcount (69.00 per cent) are women.

More than three-quarters of Queensland public sector FTE (78.61 per cent) are permanently employed.

Queensland public sector employees work in a wide range of occupations including teachers, doctors, nurses, child safety officers, police officers, engineers and geologists, clerical and administration and emergency service workers.


8. March 2016 workforce statistics quick facts

There has been an overall increase of 1.97 per cent or 4,058.34 FTE in the first quarter of 2016 up from 205,529.70 in December 2015 to 209,588.04 in March 2016.

The FTE increase in the March 2016 quarter is similar to the increase that occurred one year prior, in March 2015 (4,552.84 FTE). FTE increases that occur in the March quarter are generally higher than that of other quarters, due to seasonal changes in the characteristics of the workforce. For example:

  • More teachers and school crossing supervisors are required at the start of the school year.
  • The health sector takes on many new recruits, including graduates in medicine, nursing and allied health.

The majority of the FTE increase (96.68 per cent) can be attributed to increases in six agencies which have a strong focus on service delivery. Greatest FTE increases occurred in:

  • Queensland Health, including Department of Health, Hospital and Health Services and the Queensland Ambulance Service increased by 2,229.48 FTE. This increase includes graduate intakes of 1,807.34 FTE (medical interns, nursing graduates and allied health professional graduates).
  • Department of Education and Training increased by 1,219.33 FTE with 1,080.40 of the FTE increase being teachers.
  • Department of Justice and Attorney–General increased by 192.31 FTE. The increase is mainly attributed to the recommissioning of the Borallon Correctional Centre. This includes a project team to manage the recommissioning, as well as training of additional correctional officers.
  • Department of Transport and Main Roads increased 117.52 FTE. This is attributed to the need for school crossing supervisors and the return to work of RoadTek staff after the close of operations for the December/January wet season. RoadTek builds and maintains roads and bridges, and provides services like traffic lights, street lighting and line marking throughout the state.
  • Queensland Police Service increased 48.21 FTE. This is attributed to an increase in the number of police and police recruits (49.62 FTE), with a small decrease in other parts of the workforce.
  • TAFE increased 116.92 FTE which is consistent with recruitment activities that typically occur in the first quarter of the year.

The health and education (including TAFE) sectors collectively account for 87.86 per cent of the total FTE increase in March 2016.

More than 9 out of 10 public servants (91.03 per cent) in the Queensland Government are engaged in frontline and frontline support roles:

  • Frontline roles are those that deliver services directly to the public, including teachers, nurses, doctors, police officers, ambulance officers and firefighters.
  • Frontline support roles are ‘non-corporate services’ roles that provide essential support, enabling the effective delivery of frontline services, including hospital and school cleaners, road workers and school groundskeepers.

These public sector employees work in 20 government departments and 15 other government organisations. The biggest employers are Queensland Health, the Department of Education and Training and TAFE, and the Queensland Police Service. Together they make up 78.49 per cent of the public sector workforce. In other words, almost four out of every five public sector employees are engaged in providing health, education and training, and police services.

More than two-thirds of Queensland public sector headcount (68.90 per cent) are women.

Queensland public sector employees work in a wide range of occupations including urban and regional planners, engineers and geologists as well as teachers, doctors, nurses, child safety officers, police officers and emergency service workers.


9. December 2015 workforce statistics quick facts

There has been an overall increase of 0.15% or 312.92 FTE, compared to the previous quarter (205,529.70 in December 2015 compared to 205,216.78 in September 2015).

The highest FTE increase occurred in Queensland Health–441.80 FTE.

  • More than half of the net increase (223.54 FTE) can be attributed to increases in non-corporate managerial and clerical, nursing, operational and health practitioner roles, and intakes of graduate nurses.
  • The remainder of the increase (218.26 FTE) relates to corporate services roles that support important short-term projects, such as construction of a new hospital on the Sunshine Coast and the delivery of a new digital patient record system in hospitals.

This increase in Queensland Health, and marginal increases in a small number of other agencies, have been offset by collective decreases of 415.55 FTE across the Queensland public sector.

The largest FTE decrease was in the Department of Education and Training, which decreased by 256.08 FTE since the previous quarter. This decrease reflects reduced staffing requirements at the end of the school year.

In summary, the overall net increase in the size of the Queensland public sector since the previous quarter (312.92 FTE) reflects:

  • changes (both FTE increases and decreases) across individual agencies
  • changes in the characteristics of the workforce at a given point in time (for example, roles such as teachers and teacher aides are more likely to be subject to seasonal variations than corporate service roles)

More than 9 out of 10 public servants (90.99%) in the Queensland Government are engaged in frontline and frontline support roles.

These public sector employees work in 20 government departments and 15 other government organisations. The biggest employers are Queensland Health, the Department of Education and Training, and the Queensland Police Service.

More than two-thirds of Queensland public sector headcount (68.87%) are women.

More than one quarter of the Queensland public sector headcount (29.35%) work part-time. Most part-time employees (89.22%) are women.

Queensland public sector employees work in a wide range of occupations including urban and regional planners, engineers and geologists as well as teachers, doctors, nurses, child safety officers, police officers and emergency service workers.