Go to top of page

New ICT contracting framework

The new ICT contracting framework replaces the Government Information Technology Contracting (GITC) Framework and will be ready for use before the end of the 2016–17 financial year.

About the framework

The new framework was co-designed by industry and government, and will make it easier for buyers and suppliers to procure and deliver ICT.   

It is different from the GITC framework because it:

  • provides a choice of contract forms that reflect the risk profile of each procurement
  • streamlines supplier accreditation by reducing it to a one-step process
  • includes consideration of supplier terms and conditions for ICT services in certain circumstances
  • improves efficiencies in procurement times.

Implementing the new framework

You can choose whether to use GITC or the new framework during its introductory period.

Our advice depends on the situation you are in. See potential scenarios below based on the questions you have been asking.

Suppliers seeking to do business with the Queensland Government will continue to obtain accreditation through QAssure.

To find out more about how your agency is implementing the framework, talk to your agency representative. Email ICTmodernisation@dsiti.qld.gov.au to find out who your agency change representative is.

Existing contracts

What happens to existing GITC contracts?

Existing GITC contracts that are current when the new framework commences will remain in place for their duration unless otherwise terminated in accordance with the contract terms.

What happens with contracts that are for ICT but have used the ‘General  Contract Conditions’ for general goods and services?

Existing contracts that are current when the new framework commences will remain in place for their duration unless otherwise terminated in accordance with the contract terms.

I’ve purchased software under a different contract model. Which terms and conditions prevail?

If you’ve purchased under a different contract model, then that is the only contract and terms and conditions that are valid.

Existing Standard Offer Arrangements (SOAs)

How will existing SOAs be affected?

An SOA will continue for its duration unless the parties to the SOA agree to end it, or it is terminated in accordance with its provisions. Customers can continue to purchase under the SOA for its duration.

What is the schedule for transitioning existing SOAs?

No existing SOAs will be transitioned when the new framework commences.  

Can we extend existing SOAs?

Yes. SOAs can be extended until all extensions are exercised.

Releasing Invitation to Offers (ITOs)

If I have released an ITO under the GITC framework, do I need to change it?

If the ITO has already been released using the GITC framework contract form you can continue to proceed with the ITO under its terms.

Preparing an ITO

If I’m preparing an ITO, do I have to wait until the new framework is ready and use one of those contracts?

If you are preparing an ITO, you have the choice of continuing with the existing GITC framework or using the new framework during the introductory period.

Negotiating contracts

If I’m currently in negotiations with a supplier under the GITC framework, what do I do?

Depending on the stage of the negotiations, you have the choice of continuing with the existing GITC framework or using the new framework during the introductory period.

Register for training

See training courses for the new ICT contracting framework (training is not mandatory).

Why is this happening?

GITC was developed as a national framework in the 1990s, but most state and federal government organisations have moved away from the original framework.

In 2015, an independent review of GITC found that it had not kept pace with the needs of government and the ICT industry. With most ICT procurement contracts valued at under $1 million, the review aimed to find a government and industry co-designed solution that would:

  • reduce the cost of doing business with government 
  • enable simple and fast procurement 
  • retain adequate protection for contracting parties 
  • allow contracts to be formed for emerging and innovative ICT products and services.

Watch the video to find out more about how the framework was co-designed by industry and government.

Video transcript

Since the 1990s, the Queensland Government has procured ICT products and services through the Government Information Technology Contracting (GITC) framework - a one-size-fits-all model.

In 2015 there were 1,508 accredited GITC suppliers and it is estimated that the Queensland Government signed 1,400 GITC contracts, valued at around $800 million.

Many of the suppliers and ICT products and services available today didn’t exist when the framework was created.

Marginal updates to the GITC framework have not allowed it to keep up with the fast pace of innovation and technology development.

A review of the GITC contracting framework took place in 2015.

The purpose was to answer the question ‘What is the right contracting framework for ICT procurement for Queensland Government?’

Through a series of consultations and co-design workshops with suppliers, legal firms and government representatives, the review concluded a more contemporary approach to ICT contracting was needed.

The aim was to establish a framework that:

  • reduces the cost of doing business with government
  • enables simple and fast procurement
  • provides protection for contracting parties; and
  • allows contracts to be formed for emerging and innovative ICT products and services

A framework that provides a choice of contract forms appropriate for the risk and value of each procurement.

We then embarked on the GITC refresh, a 3 stage journey that has led us to where we are today.

It has involved suppliers and government representatives working together to co-design a new framework.

The first stage involved small groups of industry and government stakeholders shaping the key aspects of the framework, ready for broad consultation.

It also brought to light some quick wins to make using the current GITC framework easier.

The second stage was where suppliers and government representatives were invited to be part of the wider consultation.

Over 200 stakeholders were invited to workshops and to take surveys to provide their input and feedback on the key elements of the framework – the contracts, model for pre-qualification, a contract type decision tool, guidelines for using supplier terms and conditions and the approach to transition to the new framework.

To ensure the best outcomes from the consultation, we agreed to hold ourselves to six engagement principles.

The third and final stage is when the new framework is rolled out and the documents are ready for use, acknowledging there are some existing contractual arrangements that will remain until they come to an end.  

Thank you to everyone who has been a part of this journey. It has been a testament to how we can work together to deliver on efficiencies for both buyers and suppliers in Queensland.

More information