Marketing services

The Marketing services sub-category in General Goods and Services provides a range of advertising, research, media monitoring and secure print services to support government campaigns and projects.

The category manages SOAs which aim to maximise savings and provide government agencies with value for money. The SOAs include:

See more information about QGP0056-18 on the Queensland Contracts Directory.

Creative solutions include, but are not limited to: 

  • advertising
  • creative strategies, campaign development and implementation 
  • brand development and management
  • copywriting
  • production services 
  • digital strategies, campaign development and implementation 
  • social media.

Steps to use the creative solutions SOA

  • Step 1 – Selecting a supplier from the panel
  • Step 2 – Number of quotes and information required
  • Step 3 – Evaluating responses
  • Step 4 – Issuing a contract
  • Step 5 – Managing a contract
  • Other considerations

Step 1 - Selecting a supplier from the panel

  • The easiest way to buy is using a supplier under an existing whole-of-government SOA. Suppliers are prequalified, so buyers can contact them directly for quotes. Refer to the creative solutions SOA QGP0056-18.
  • The Supplier Capability Matrix lists contact details, recent projects and other details of each supplier under this arrangement. Additionally, the Supplier Matrix provides supplier’s details in relation to the Queensland Procurement Policy, office location, whether they are a small to medium business, etc.
  • You should follow the Government Advertising and Communication Committee (GACC) The GACC secretariat, within the Department of the Premier and Cabinet (DPC) advise that buyers should not contact a creative supplier until Stage 1 GACC approval.
  • Refer to DPC’s Marketing Matters This is a resource hub for Queensland Government marketing, communication and event professionals to access government style guides, templates and key contact lists and learn more about a range of government related topics, including advertising, events and branding.

Step 2 - Number of quotes and information required

  • Before seeking quotes, buyers should refer to their department’s procurement procedure as this governs the way the department uses SOAs.
  • Unless the services are critical to the department’s core operations and because it is a managed SOA (with suppliers already demonstrating their knowledge, experience, and rates under the SOA), generally risks are considered routine (low or not applicable).
  • Based on the complexity, it is recommended using the value/matrix to base the number of quotes sought under this SOA:
    • Routine value/risk: 1 quote (direct negotiation)
    • Leverage/focus value/risk: up to 3 quotes
    • Strategic value/risk: 3 quotes with the following considerations:
      • quoting (pitch) fees are not part of the Supplier Rate Card
      • if requesting suppliers to do a significant amount of work (as part of the quoting process), such as reviewing the marketplace, developing a campaign strategy, concepting multiple ideas and producing complex mock ups that may require hiring of talent and shooting material, asking suppliers to physically present the quote or if your campaign is long-term, you should consider paying a quote (pitch) fee. You may wish to base this fee on hourly rates within the QGP0056-18 – Rate Card (CONFIDENTIAL).
Other considerations when seeking quotes/communication with suppliers
  • There are good reasons to share your budget with suppliers when seeking quotes. This approach helps suppliers to better understand the scope of work, it can save time by removing ambiguity about priorities and relevance, and it builds trust. For example, high end production is not possible with $50k, however it is possible with $300k.
  • Be as clear as possible. For example, differentiate between creative concepts and production and advise if the budget is for creative concepts only. If there is no exact budget or the preference is not to share an exact figure, suppliers can be provided with an indication of range of spend (e.g. $51k-$100k). Refer to the example SOA Order.
  • Buyers can use the example SOA Order form or develop a communication brief to thoroughly inform suppliers about expectations for the work. This includes:
    • being specific about the scope of work, (e.g. design of stakeholder resources, creative concepts, or full production)
    • setting realistic deadlines (e.g. allow for any public holidays during the quoting period)
    • being transparent where possible (e.g. tell suppliers that other quotes are being sought).
  • Maintain regular communication with suppliers throughout the quoting process and provide the same information to all potential suppliers. If your project has ceased or has been put on hold, let the suppliers know as soon as possible.
Communication with suppliers before seeking a quote
  • As part of your information gathering exercise and due diligence, and without committing to a project, it’s often worthwhile discussing your advertising project with the supplier/s at the outset which is before you formally seek a quote. However, in relation to advertising/communication that requires Government Advertising and Communication Committee (GACC) review, the GACC secretariat advise that you should not contact a creative supplier until you have Stage 1 GACC approval.
  • Principle 3 of the Queensland Procurement Policy (QPP) outlines the Government’s requirements and expectations about integrity, probity and accountability within procurement.
  • When talking to suppliers, document communication and ensure the same information is given to all. This does not mean appointing and/or following the suppliers’ suggestions.
  • In all communications, whether you are phoning, meeting, or emailing suppliers, don’t divulge other supplier’s information or commit to any activity (i.e. do not inadvertently make a verbal promise only obtaining information).
  • For urgent jobs, advise the supplier/s the anticipated timing for releasing the quote.
  • If it’s necessary to quote verbally, follow your department’s procurement procedures. Also refer to the Inviting Offers guide for more information on obtaining verbal quotations.

Step 3 - Evaluating responses

  • Develop clear specifications and evaluation criteria. Evaluation criteria should be specific to each campaign (depending on the objective of your campaign), but may include:
    • response to the advertising challenge through the proposed creative solution
    • learnings from previous communication, analysis
    • campaign themes
    • agency resources
    • capabilities
    • indicative timeframes
    • agency specialties
    • measurement of outcomes
    • experience
    • budget etc.
  • Always advise the unsuccessful suppliers about the result and provide feedback. Having clear evaluation criteria and documentation will assist. More information is available in the Evaluating Offers guide.

Step 4 - Issuing a contract

Once a preferred supplier is selected, buyers should refer to their department’s procurement procedures which include:

  • obtaining appropriate approvals from the relevant delegate (which includes financial and procurement)
  • ensuring your order is compliant with General Contract Terms and Conditions or other conditions deemed appropriate by your agency’s procurement procedures. Be very clear about deliverables and payment milestones. Refer to the payment terms (Schedule 2) and timeframes (Clause 10.5) in the SOA details
  • raise a purchase order, referencing the SOA number QGP0056-18 or email the purchase order to the supplier’s authorised representative
  • file all documentation as per your agency’s record management requirements
  • manage payments in accordance with your agency’s Financial Management Practice Manual (FMPM).

The buyer agency’s procurement team may use specific documents but always quote the QGP0056-18 SOA number.

Step 5 - Managing a contract

  • Managing a contract is an important part of the procurement sourcing process. Consider contract management issues, such as how supplier performance will be measured, early on.
  • There are 3 major phases of contract management for consideration when managing a service:

Other considerations

Conducting focus group testing about campaigns
Website development
  • Website development is not a core service under the creative solutions SOA, meaning creative agency suppliers have not been assessed against this criterion. However, if the buyer agency chooses to use the supplier to develop an associated campaign website, then seek advice from the buyer department’s information technology office and procurement team. Information Communication Technology (ICT) products and services have specific contract conditions. Refer to more information on creating an ICT contract.
  • For more information, refer to how to buy ICT products and services as well as the Queensland Information Technology Contracting (QITC) tool kit and QITC framework which allows buyers to choose the contract type and reflects the risk and value of the ICT procurement.
Booking media
  • A media placement supplier has a distinctly different role from a creative supplier that physically produces creative concepts, content, and advertisements.
  • Media placement services do not fall within the creative solutions scope of services. Master media agency, MediaCom Australia Pty Ltd (MediaCom) (SOA managed by the Department of the Premier and Cabinet), must book and/or place media (including online display and mobile advertising).
  • Even on the occasion when the creative supplier states they can do a booking faster, the booking must go via MediaCom. The consolidated buying power ensures the Government realises substantial savings based on negotiated discounts and individual campaign savings. If a quicker turnaround is required, it is at your department’s discretion to negotiate shorter timeframes through MediaCom.

See more information about QGP0035-16 on the Queensland Contracts Directory.

Services include, but are not limited to:

  • pre-testing and post-testing
  • insight into market trends and user experiences
  • evaluating customer experience/satisfaction
  • stakeholder research
  • product development research
  • database management.

Steps to use the market and social research SOA

  • Step 1 – Selecting a supplier from the panel
  • Step 2 – Number of quotes and information required
  • Step 3 – Evaluating responses
  • Step 4 – Issuing a contract
  • Step 5 – Managing a contract
  • Other considerations

Step 1 - Selecting a supplier from the panel

  • The easiest way to buy is using a supplier under an existing whole-of-government SOA. Refer to the market and social research SOA QGP0035-16. Suppliers are prequalified, so buyers can contact them directly for quotes.
  • The Supplier Matrix lists contact details, recent projects and other details of each supplier under this arrangement. Additionally, the Supplier Matrix provides supplier’s details in relation to the Queensland Procurement Policy, office location, whether they are a small to medium business, etc.

Step 2 - Number of quotes and information required

  • Before seeking quotes, buyers should refer to their department’s procurement procedure as this governs the way the department uses SOAs.
  • Unless the services are critical to the department’s core operations and because it is a managed SOA (with suppliers already demonstrating their knowledge, experience, and rates under the SOA), generally risks are considered routine (low or not applicable).
  • Based on the complexity, it is recommended using the value/matrix to base the number of quotes sought under this SOA:
  • Routine value/risk: 1 quote (direct negotiation)
  • Leverage/focus value/risk: up to 3 quotes
  • Strategic value/risk: 3 quotes with the following considerations:
    • quoting (pitch) fees are not part of the Supplier Rate Card
    • if requesting suppliers to do a significant amount of work (as part of the quoting process), you may wish to base this fee on hourly rates within the QGP0035-16 – Supplier Price Matrix (CONFIDENTIAL).
Other considerations when seeking quotes/communication with suppliers
  • There are good reasons to share your budget with suppliers. This approach helps suppliers to better understand the scope of work, it can save time by removing ambiguity about priorities and relevance, and it builds trust.
  • Be as clear as possible. If there is no exact budget or the preference is not to share an exact figure, suppliers can be provided with an indication of range of spend (e.g. $51k-$100k). Refer to the example project brief template.
  • Buyers can use the example project brief template or develop a research brief to thoroughly inform suppliers about expectations for the work. This includes:
    • being specific about the scope of work, (e.g. research approach, if known, budget allocation).
    • setting realistic deadlines (e.g. allow for any public holidays during the quoting period)
    • being transparent where possible (e.g. tell suppliers that other quotes are being sought).
  • Maintain regular communication with suppliers throughout the quoting process and provide the same information to all potential suppliers. If your project has ceased or has been put on hold, let the suppliers know as soon as possible.
Communication with suppliers before seeking a quote
  • As part of your information gathering exercise and due diligence, and without committing to a project, it’s often worthwhile discussing your research project with the supplier/s at the outset which is before you formally seek a quote.
  • Principle 3 of the Queensland Procurement Policy (QPP) outlines the Government’s requirements and expectations about integrity, probity and accountability within procurement.
  • When talking to suppliers, document communication and ensure the same information is given to all. This does not mean appointing and/or following the suppliers’ suggestions.
  • In all communications, whether you are phoning, meeting, or emailing suppliers, don’t divulge other supplier’s information or commit to any activity (i.e. do not inadvertently make a verbal promise only obtaining information).
  • For urgent jobs, advise the supplier/s the anticipated timing for releasing the quote.
  • If it’s necessary to quote verbally, follow your department’s procurement procedures. Also refer to the Inviting Offers guide for more information on obtaining verbal quotations.

Step 3 - Evaluating responses

  • Develop clear specifications and evaluation criteria. Evaluation criteria should be specific to the research project (depending on the objective), but may include:
    • response to the research challenge
    • learnings from previous research
    • agency resources
    • capabilities
    • indicative timeframes
    • agency specialties
    • experience budget etc.
  • Always advise the unsuccessful suppliers about the result and provide feedback. Having clear evaluation criteria and documentation will assist. More information is available in the Evaluating Offers guide.

Step 4 – Issuing a contract

Once a preferred supplier is selected, buyers should refer to their department’s procurement procedures which include:

  • obtaining appropriate approvals from the relevant delegate (which includes financial and procurement)
  • ensuring your order is compliant with General Contract Terms and Conditions or other conditions deemed appropriate by your agency’s procurement procedures. Be very clear about deliverables and payment milestones. Refer to the payment terms (Schedule 2) and timeframes (Clause 10.5) in the SOA details
  • raise a purchase order, referencing the SOA number QGP0035-16 and email the purchase order to the supplier’s authorised representative
  • file all documentation as per your agency’s record management requirements
  • manage payments in accordance with your agency’s Financial Management Practice Manual (FMPM).

The buyer agency’s procurement team may use specific documents but always quote the QGP0035-16 SOA number.

Step 5 – Managing a contract

  • Effective planning for managing a contract is an important part of the procurement sourcing process. Consider contract management issues, such as how supplier performance will be measured, early on.
  • There are 3 major phases of contract management for consideration when managing a service:

There is no common-use supply arrangement for printing (the Independent Print Management arrangement expired in June 2019).

The procurement of print services occurs on a localised basis, with government agencies sourcing print services as required under their own procurement procedures and in accordance with the Queensland Procurement Policy.

Under the QPP agencies consider:

  • environmental targets in relation to procuring Australian-sourced, environmentally accredited paper products
  • a local benefits test evaluates the benefits that a supplier would bring to a local area
  • a 25 percent target for procuring from small to medium enterprises, increasing to 30 per cent by 30 June 2022.

Departments tailor their individual print arrangements to their own specific requirements, while having a full choice of suppliers on the market. Buyers may want to refer to your own agency, as some agencies have print arrangements for stationery, forms, etc.

Printers can continue to work directly with agencies for ad-hoc printing requirements.

Refer to the Sustainable procurement guide: Print services in relation to sustainability considerations for departmental decision makers.

If buyers are approached by printers seeking advice regarding Queensland Government work, refer them to the printers register on QTenders to receive any relevant alerts to any printing projects run by government agencies. 

In addition, businesses located in a particular area may wish to make themselves known to nearby government offices should they require print services at a future point in time. There is also additional information about supplying to the Queensland Government available on the Business Queensland website.

See more information about GGS0062-20 on the Queensland Contracts Directory.

The secure print SOA (previously known as PTD0029-15 reserved print SOA) includes the timely and secure supply of confidential hard copy printed documents including, but not limited to Parliamentary Bills, Explanatory Notes, Acts, Legislation, and other government secure print requirements.

The supplier administers a secure online shopping cart for the public to purchase printed copies, with a dedicated online ordering system (with credit card back-end).

See more information about QGP0053-18 on the Queensland Contracts Directory.

This SOA covers comprehensive media monitoring of Australian newspapers, magazines, television, radio, and online news sources across local, regional, metropolitan, and national and non-daily media.

Master media advertising placement – DPC-88-2017

The master media advertising placement services (booking and placing media) standing offer arrangement DPC-88-2017 is managed by the Department of the Premier and Cabinet.

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